Monday, March 24, 2014

Learning Classifier System Open Repository

It is time to announce the Learning Classifier System Open Repository (LCSOR), a meeting point to foster the popularization of these exciting evolutionary computation techniques. In this repository I will upload distinct implementations of different Learning Classifier Systems. To start with, I uploaded a first version of the sUpervised Classifier System (UCS). Notice I created a page for this contend under the label LCSOR.


I hope practitioners will enjoy this experience.

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Robust on-line neural learning classifier system for data streams

The ever-increasing integration of technology in the different areas of science and industry has fostered practitioners the design of applications that generate stupendous amounts of data on-line (e.g., smart sensors or network monitoring just to mention two real cases). Extracting information from these data is key, in order to gain a better understanding of the processes that the data are describing. However, learning from these data poses new challenges to traditional data mining techniques, which are not designed to deal with data streams: data in which concepts and noise vary over time.

In this regard, I am proud to present the supervised neural constructivist system (SNCS), a neural Michigan-style Learning Classifier System that has been designed to provide a fast reaction capacity and adaptability to the distinct possible changes in concept (concept drifts) with varying noisy inputs. 

Inheriting the intrinsically on-line fashion of Michigan-style learning classifier systems, SNCS evolves a population of multilayer perceptrons that allow the proposed algorithm to function in a variety of problem situations producing accurate classification of data, whether the data are static or in dynamic streams.

The paper is the following:


It can be downloaded from Springer.

Saturday, December 28, 2013

Insights on Linkage Learning: Truly Competent Genetic Algorithms

In the last post we acknowledged that competent GAs are those that automatically identify building blocks (BBs) and exchange these BBs without disrupting them. As a simple example, the compact genetic algorithm (cGA) was presented for competently solving the trap-n functions. In spite of the good results obtained by cGA in these environments, this algorithm is way too simple for truly tough problems: the m-concatenated trap-n problems, as depicted in Figure 1. In these kinds of problems, deceptive trap-n functions are concatenated into a single, bigger problem.  cGA’s probability vector representation cannot detect the complicated combinations of BBs so, again, a new strategy to tackle this challenging environments is required: we need an order-n probabilistic optimization algorithm (in contrast cGA is of order-1).

Figure 1: the 4-concatenated trap-3: It is composed of four trap-3 functions and the objective is to find 111111111111, but the problem is deceptive and guides the learner towards 000000000000 (a local optima!). Click to enlarge.

Following the initial steps of primeval estimation-distribution algorithms (EDAs), a complex probabilistic model is used to detect BBs (instead of the simple probability vector). One of the most successful EDAs that use such idea is the extended compact genetic algorithm (ECGA) [1]. This algorithm works by detecting the trap sub-functions and then computing the proportions of all the m-combinations of n-bits in the corresponding string positions. ECGA does this by learning marginal product models (MPMs).  The idea behind it is that the MPM contains the probabilities of each combination of BB and these are used to model and sample forthcoming populations. In this regard, to obtain the right combination of BB the algorithm uses a combined complexity criterion (CC): it greedily tries to minimize the amount of bits required to describe the model while being accurate.

ECGA works as in the following (rather simplified) pseudocode:
  1.  It first generates a random population of size N.
  2.  Evaluate the fitness of each individual.
  3. Generate the first MPM model assuming that all the variables are independent and then compute CC.
  4. Compact the current MPM greedily (newMPM) trying the combination of BB with better score (newCC).
  5. If newCC < CC then MPM = newMPM and go to step (4), otherwise skip to step (6).
  6. Sample a new population using MPM.
  7. If the termination criteria are met, exit. Otherwise go to step (2).

I have coded the ECGA in R solving the m-concatenated trap-3 function; it is in the following.

 #Class definition.  
 setClass( "Individual", representation( chromosome = "array", fitness = "numeric", size = "numeric" ) )  
 #Concatenated m-Trap-3 function fitness computation. Individuals must have length 3 * m (for instance 12)!  
 #Ind is the individual to be evaluated.  
 computeFitness <- function( ind ) {  
     fit <- 0  
     size <- 3 #Size of each block  
     i <- 1  
     while( i <= length( ind ) ) {   
         bb <- ind[ i:(i + size - 1) ]  
         no <- sum( bb )  
         if( no <= (length( bb ) - 1) ) {  
             fit <- fit + (length( bb ) - 1 ) - no  
         } else {  
             fit <- fit + length( bb )  
         }  
         i <- i + size  
     }  
     return( fit )  
 }  
 #Constructor: it initializes individuals at random.  
 Individual <- function( indSize ) {  
     ind <- array( rbinom( indSize, 1, 0.5 ), indSize )  
     fit <- computeFitness( ind )  
     return( new( "Individual", chromosome = as.array( ind ), fitness = fit, size = indSize ) )  
 }  
 #Another Initialization function for Individual class.  
 #ind is an array containing the chromosomes of the individual.  
 Initialize <- function( ind ) {  
     fit <- computeFitness( ind )  
     return( new( "Individual", chromosome = as.array( ind ), fitness = fit, size = length( ind ) ) )  
 }  
 #Accesor Methods.  
 getFitness <- function( obj ) obj@fitness  
 getSize <- function( obj ) obj@size  
 getChromosome <- function( obj ) obj@chromosome  
 #Class containing the model  
 setClass( "SModel", representation( Nij = "array", size = "numeric" ) )  
 #Initializer.  
 SModel <- function( partial, partSize ) {  
     return( new( "SModel", Nij = as.array( partial ), size = partSize ))  
 }  
 #Accesor Methods.  
 getModel <- function( obj ) obj@Nij  
 #It computes the marginal product model.  
 #BBList is the building block list.  
 #Lbb is the array containing the number of (possibly) merged BBs.  
 #Nbb is the size of the Lbb array.  
 computeMPM <- function( pop, BBList, Lbb, Nbb ) {  
     MPM <- list()  
     for( i in 1:Nbb ) {  
         Nij <- array( 0, 2^Lbb[i] )  
         for( ps in 1:length( pop ) ) { #For the entire population...  
             tmp <- as.numeric( intToBits( 0 ) )  
             count <- Lbb[i] #Required for mapping the reversed binary numbers obtained by intToBits().  
             for( j in BBList[[i]] ) {   
                 tmp[ count ] <- pop[[ps]]@chromosome[j]  
                 count <- count - 1  
             }  
             dec <- packBits( as.integer( tmp ), "integer" ) #dec contains the combination  
             Nij[ dec + 1 ] <- 1 + Nij[ dec + 1 ]  
         }  
         MPM <- c( MPM, SModel( Nij, length( Nij ) ) )  
     }  
     return( MPM )  
 }  
 #It computes the complexity of the model.  
 #Lbb is the array containing the number of (possibly) merged BBs.  
 #Nbb is the size of the Lbb array.  
 Cm <- function( popSize, Lbb, Nbb ) {  
     sum <- 0  
     for( i in 1:Nbb ) {  
         sum <- sum + (2^Lbb[i] - 1)  
     }  
     return (sum * (log2( popSize + 1 ) ) )  
 }  
 #It computes the compressed population complexity.  
 #MPM is the marginal product model.  
 Cp <- function( MPM, popSize, Lbb, Nbb ) {  
     sum <- 0  
     for( i in 1:Nbb ) {  
         for( j in 1:(2^Lbb[i]) ) {  
             if( getModel( MPM[[i]] )[j] != 0 ) {  
                 sum <- sum - (getModel( MPM[[i]] )[j] / popSize) * log2( (getModel( MPM[[i]] )[j] / popSize) )  
             }  
         }  
     }  
     sum <- sum * popSize  
     return( sum )  
 }  
 #It choooses the model out of the given one.  
 #It returns a list containing (1) the model, (2) the building block list,  
 #(3) the list of building block ids, (4) the array with the building   
 #block counter and (5) the new complexity model cost.  
 chooseModel <- function( p, indSize, BBList, Lbb, Nbb ) {  
     popSize <- length( p )  
     Ccp <- .Machine$integer.max - 1  
     mpmp <- list()  
     BBListp <- list()  
     Nbbp <- 0  
     Lbbp <- array( 0, indSize )  
         for( i in 1:(Nbb - 1) ) { #For each building block (except for the last one)...  
             for( j in (i + 1):Nbb ) { #The remaining building blocks...  
                 BBList2 <- list()  
                 BBList2 <- list ( c( BBList[[i]], BBList[[j]] ) )  
                 for( k in 1:Nbb ) {  
                     if( k != i && k != j ) {  
                         BBList2 <- c( BBList2, BBList[k] )  
                     }  
                 }  
                 Lbb2 <- array( 0, indSize )  
                 for( k in 1:length( BBList2 ) ) {  
                     Lbb2[k] <- length( BBList2[[k]] )  
                 }  
                 Nbb2 <- length( BBList2 )  
                 #Check if the new model is better than the previous.  
                 mpm2 <- computeMPM( p, BBList2, Lbb2, Nbb2 )   
                 Cc2 <- Cm( popSize, Lbb2, Nbb2 ) + Cp( mpm2, popSize, Lbb2, Nbb2 )  
                 if( Cc2 < Ccp ) { #Choose the smallest one.  
                     Ccp <- Cc2  
                     mpmp <- mpm2  
                     Lbbp <- Lbb2  
                     Nbbp <- Nbb2  
                     BBListp <- BBList2  
                 }  
             } #end j-for.  
         } #end i-for.  
     return( list( mpmp, BBListp, Lbbp, Nbbp, Ccp ) )      
 }  
 #Selection operator. It returns the selected individual.  
 tournamentSelection <- function( pop, tau ) {  
     best <- -1;  
     ind <- 1;  
     for( i in 1:tau ) {  
         ind <- as.integer( runif( 1 ) * (length( pop ) + 1) )  
         if( ind > length( pop ) ) {  
             id <- length( pop )  
         } else if( ind <= 0 ) {  
             ind <- 1  
         }  
         if( best <= 0 ) {  
             best <- ind  
         } else if( getFitness( pop[[ ind ]] ) > getFitness( pop[[ best ]] ) ) {  
             best <- ind  
         }  
     }  
     return( pop[[ ind ]] );  
 }  
 #It returns the best individuals.  
 #howMany it tells the function how many best individuals return.  
 getBests <- function( pop, howMany ) {  
     if( howMany > length( pop ) ) {  
         howMany <- length( pop )  
     } else if( howMany < 1 ) {  
         howMany <- 1  
     }  
     #Sort the population (insertion sort).  
     for( i in 1:length( pop ) ) {  
         valueToInsert <- pop[[i]]  
         holePos <- i  
         while( holePos > 1 && getFitness( valueToInsert ) > getFitness( pop[[ holePos - 1 ]] ) ) {  
             pop[[ holePos ]] <- pop[[ holePos - 1 ]]  
             holePos <- holePos - 1  
         }  
         pop[[ holePos ]] <- valueToInsert  
     }  
     bests <- list()  
     for( i in 1:howMany ) {  
         bests <- c( bests, c = pop[[i]] )  
     }  
     return( bests )  
 }  
 #It generates individuals using the model in a roulette-wheel fashion.  
 generateIndividual <- function( indSize, mpm, BBList, Lbb ) {  
     where <- 1  
     ind <- array( 0, indSize )  
     for( i in mpm ) {  
         propSum <- sum( i@Nij )  
         choicePoint <- runif( 1 ) * propSum  
         j <- 1  
         propSum <- i@Nij[[j]]  
         while( choicePoint > propSum ) {  
             j <- j + 1  
             if( i@size < j ) {   
                 break  
             } else {  
                 propSum <- propSum + i@Nij[[j]]  
             }  
         }  
         #Once the BB is selected, generate the individuals.  
         for( bits in 1:Lbb[ where ] ) {  
             tmp <- as.numeric( intToBits( (j - 1) ) )  
             ind[ BBList[[ where ]][ bits ] ] <- tmp[ Lbb[ where ] - bits + 1 ]  
         }  
         where <- where + 1  
     }  
     return( Initialize( ind ) )  
 }  
 #The main ECGA algorithm.  
 #indSize is the number of genes in an individual.  
 #popSize is the size of the population.  
 #Pc is the probability of crossover.  
 #tau is the selection pressure parameter for tournament selection.  
 #iterations is the number of loops the algorithm will perform.  
 #It returns a list containing (1) the final model, (2) the building block list,  
 #(3) the list of building block ids, (4) the array with the building   
 #block counter, (5) the new complexity model cost, (6) the final population.  
 ECGA <- function( indSize, popSize, Pc, tau, iterations ) {  
     pop <- list()  
     for( i in 1:popSize ) { #Generate the initial population randomly.  
         pop <- c( pop, c = Individual( indSize ) )  
     }  
     tstamp <- 1  
     while( tstamp < iterations ) {  
         #Selection.  
         newPop <- list()  
         for( i in 1:tau ) {  
             newPop <- c( newPop, tournamentSelection( pop, tau ) )  
         }  
         newPopSize <- length( newPop )  
         #Start the building block list.  
         BBList <- list()  
         for( i in 1:indSize ) { #Assume that all variables are independent...  
             BBList <- c( BBList, list( c( i ) ) )  
         }  
         Lbb <- array( 1, indSize )   
         Nbb <- indSize  
         #Compute how well the initial model fits.  
         mpm <- computeMPM( newPop, BBList, Lbb, Nbb )   
         Cc <- Cm( newPopSize, Lbb, Nbb ) + Cp( mpm, newPopSize, Lbb, Nbb )  
         improvement <- TRUE  
         while( improvement == TRUE && length( BBList ) > 1 ) {  
             tmpList <- chooseModel( newPop, indSize, BBList, Lbb, Nbb )  
             if( tmpList[[5]] < Cc ) { #Evaluate the model.  
                 mpm <- tmpList[[1]]  
                 BBList <- tmpList[[2]]  
                 Lbb <- tmpList[[3]]  
                 Nbb <- tmpList[[4]]  
                 Cc <- tmpList[[5]]  
             } else {  
                 improvement <- FALSE  
             }  
         }  
         #Crossover.  
         if( runif( 1 ) < Pc ) {  
             newInd <- 0  
             while( newInd < round( Pc * popSize ) ) {  
                 newPop <- c( newPop, generateIndividual( indSize, mpm, BBList, Lbb ) )  
                 newInd <- newInd + 1  
             }  
         }  
         conserve <- round( popSize * (1.0 - Pc) )  
         if( conserve > 0 ) {  
             newPop <- c( newPop, getBests( pop, conserve ) )  
         }  
         #Replace the old population with the new one.  
         pop <- newPop  
         tstamp <- tstamp + 1  
     }  
     return( list( mpm, BBList, Lbb, Nbb, Cc, pop ) )  
 }  
 #usage: res <- ECGA( 12, 200, 0.9, 50, 20 )  

References 

[1] Harik, G.R.;  Lobo, F.G.; Sastry, K.: "Linkage Learning via Probabilistic Modeling in the Extended Compact Genetic Algorithm (ECGA)," Scalable Optimization via Probabilistic Modeling 2006: 39-61